Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Classroom Economy Resources









I am happy to say the my team has decided to do the classroom economy with me this year! I think we will all implement it at various levels to accommodate our different classrooms. I am very excited about my new 4th grade team. I think we are going to work very well together!

 This is a comprehensive look at how I am using the classroom economy this year. I got the idea from There Are No Shortcuts by Rafe Esquith. Then I found this website:


It has all the resources you could ever want. They have also tailored the program for various grade levels. You don't have to do a thing!
Click HERE to go to the 4-5 grade download page. These are the resources you will find.




I wanted to personalize our list of bonuses and fines, so mine look a little different from the resources you can download at the website above.

Click HERE to grab the poster version of Bonus Opportunities. 
Click HERE to grab the poster version of Fines.
 Click HERE to get the regular pdf version.


I printed the signs, cut them out, and mounted them on scrapbook paper. These are laminated so I can write student names and be able to wipe them clean when we change jobs.
Click HERE to grab my job signs.
Click HERE to get the pdf.
Right now I am thinking we will only change jobs once during the year. We will reapply for jobs in January after the Christmas break. I really want my students to own their jobs. I want the duties to become automatic so that our class runs smoothly.

Click HERE to grab the pdf.
These are on clipboards for the police officers to keep track of bonuses and fines for their citizens. They will just place a tally mark where needed. We will use these at the end of the month to add bonus money to pay checks and then for students to pay any fines from their total.


I have pages for 6 students per clipboard. 

Right now I am planning on having a payday once a month. Here is my rough schedule:

To keep things going, I will award bonus money every week. The students will be responsible for keeping track of their money. They will have an envelope in the STAR binders to hold their money. If they lose it, it's gone. If it is ripped in any way, it is invalid. I really want to instill responsibility with this.

At the end of every month, after payday, we will have an auction. This is where students will be faced with supply and demand and many other economic concepts. They will have to decide to spend their money or save it. We will discuss the merits of having some money in reserve for emergencies (bad choices resulting in fines, docked paycheck for not performing duties, etc).

I really hope that I can commit to this and make it work. It has the potential to teach life lessons. I will keep you posted!

12 comments :

jen ormsbee said...

Hi Becca!
I love having a classroom economy! I love that the kiddos know what their jobs are and I don't have to remind them :) I never change jobs though--what I give them at the beginning of the year is it. Sometimes I tweak the jobs or add more.

I try to do the auctions 3 times a year (usually before a long break), but the last few years, I've only been able to squeeze them one in at the end of the year.

I may try offering bonuses and fines this year. Last year, I only offered a 30$ bonus for completed homework per week (or they got 5$ for the days they did their homework). I find giving bonuses and fines so hard to manage--I think I may make a full page spreadsheet, so I can do the tallies :)

Thanks for this post--it's making me think deeper about my classroom economy!

--jen

Suzy Q said...

I have done a short classroom economy (one month) with my second graders for our social studies unit on working for wants and needs.

Obviously, I kept the money amount smaller so they could do the math. So, it might be $1 for each completed homework assignment, $5 rent/week, etc. Each student had a simple chart on his desk all day (2 columns: credits and debits) and three lines ($1, $5, $10) and I just put the tallies as needed.

At the end of the week they had to total each box, both columns and then subtract the debits from credits. Anyone who did the math right earned another $5.

We decided the jobs as a class and then I made the class choose which ones were high, medium and low paying...had to have at least one in each category to make it realistic.

Long story short, even though it was a short unit it was jam packed with learning experiences.

Have fun implementing this!

5ft2eyesofblue said...

I used to do something very similar and it worked wonderfully. It wasn't too hard to keep up with the kiddos doing their jobs. I made a job application for them to fill out for their jobs and changed them each quarter. Some students didn't want to change jobs so I let them keep it. I only posted job openings as they needed it. It really made them understand the way the world really works. Doing your job well earns money and when you do something wrong you are fined for it.

5ft2eyesofblue said...

I used to do something very similar and it worked wonderfully. It wasn't too hard to keep up with the kiddos doing their jobs. I made a job application for them to fill out for their jobs and changed them each quarter. Some students didn't want to change jobs so I let them keep it. I only posted job openings as they needed it. It really made them understand the way the world really works. Doing your job well earns money and when you do something wrong you are fined for it.

Kaylee's Education Studio said...

You've got an amazing system for setting up your classroom jobs.

Anonymous said...

I love the idea of implementing a classroom economy next year. It will only be my second year teaching, so I'm still getting the hang of staying on top of everything without spending ALL of my free time doing school work (or staying supeb duper late every night). How do you stay on top of all the fines/ bonuses/ payouts?

Lindsey said...

I am going to try this next year with my fifth graders! I will be teaching the entire grade level SS but I think it would be a good idea for management inside my classroom. Plus, all those economic standards this will touch. I love that My Classroom Economy has all the resources done for you. Thanks for the idea and I will let you know how it goes :-)

Lindsey
Fabulously Fifth

br_oden said...

The other day I read this post and went to a website where you can create a poster out of a document, like your fines. I went to the website but forgot to bookmark it and now I cant find it and I see where you have it listed in the post.

Also, I am a first year teacher, teaching special education. I am thinking paying out for jobs and having them pay for fines once a month would be to far apart. Do you think it would work to do weekly? I currently about 8 students and that number could go up to about 12-14.

I had actually already found classroom economy from a workshop I went to. I love it and loved your post to see how some one is planning on implementing it.

br_oden said...

OK, I just reread my comment and that is what I get for typing it so late at night. What I meant to say was I found the website cause I thought you listed it and provided a link to it in your post but now I don't see it? What was the name of that website?

Dana Hausauer said...

I absolutely love this idea! I'm a first year teacher teaching grade 4. I would love to know how your year went using this and if you would make any changes. Thanks!!

Dana Hausauer said...

I absolutely love this idea! I'm a first year teacher teaching grade 4. I would love to know how your year went using this and if you would make any changes. Thanks!!

megwilli said...

I'm so happy I found this! I'm like you- I've always had trouble managing bonuses and fines! Definitely going to try this method with my 3rd graders this year. Thank you!!!!!

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